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SWPC HOME -> Data and Products -> Notices

Historical SWPC Data Notices


STEREO Behind In-situ data Temporarily Unavailable

January 10, 2011: The STEREO Behind In-situ data (Solar Wind, Magnetic Field, and Particles) have been unavailable since late on January 8th.  An automated shutdown of the data processing unit on STEREO-B occurred when a current limit was violated.  It may take several days to recover and get the data flowing again


In February 2011
GOES 15 will Replace GOES 11 as
Secondary SWPC GOES Proton, Electron and Magnetometer Satellite

January 10, 2011 -- GOES-11 is the SWPC Secondary GOES satellite for particle and magnetometer measurements. Due to resource constraints, SWPC will stop collecting and processing GOES 11 space weather data at the end of February 2011. This is eight months prior to the currently scheduled official September 2011 replacement of the GOES 11 spacecraft, . In February, GOES 15, at 90 degrees longitude, will become the SWPC Secondary GOES particle and magnetometer satellite.

The primary impact will be on the longitudinal spacing of the in situ Magnetometer and Energetic Particle data which currently come from the two geosynchronous locations GOES-13 at 75 degrees longitude (GOES East) and GOES-11 at 135 degrees longitude (GOES West). From February to September 2011, SWPC will provide particle and magnetometer data from GOES-13, the primary satellite at 75 degrees longitude and GOES 15, the secondary satellite, at 90 degrees longitude. This change effectively decreases longitude spatial separation between observations from 60 degrees to 15 degrees.

A second consequence of the change to GOES-15 will be the unavailability of some of the proton data. The 5 minute averages of proton flux for channels P8, P9, P10 and P11 will be temporarily unavailable due to calibration issues with both the GOES 13 and GOES 15 HEPAD sensors.

This situation will exist until around September 2011 when a new GOES satellite is brought from the storage location near 100 degrees longitude to the GOES West position at 135 degrees longitude, and will become the SWPC Secondary GOES satellite for particle and magnetometer data. From that point forward, it is anticipated that the nominal magnetometer and particle data will once again be available from the two operational GOES satellites; GOES-13 located at 75 and GOES-14 at 135 degrees.

The GOES 11 X-Ray Sensor on was turned off several years ago.

Comments and questions are welcome: SWPC.CustomerSupport@noaa.gov


GOES 15 to become Primary Satellite for X-ray and SXI data
No Secondary Satellite for X-rays or SXI

October 13, 2010 -- On October 28 at 0000UT GOES 15 will become the Primary SWPC GOES X-ray and SXI satellite replacing GOES 14. GOES 14 will be put into storage mode. There are only minor differences in the appearance of the GOES 14 and GOES 15 X-ray data at the lowest flux levels.

There is no SWPC Secondary GOES X-ray or SXI satellite.


Thule Neutron Monitor Data Discontinued

01 June, 2010 -- Thule Neutron Monitor data was discontinued on the SWPC public internet sites. The following data are no longer available from SWPC.

  • Thule Neutron Monitor 1- and -5 minute data lists The data lists will stopped on 01 June. Older files will be removed 01 July 2010.

  • Daily Thule Neutron Monitor Percent of Background field in these SWPC products was replaced with the appropriate missing data value
  • Daily Solar Indices 
  • Daily Space Weather Indices
  • Current  Space Weather Indices
  • Daily Particle Data  --   http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/ftpdir/indices/DPD.txt
    • Daily  GEOALERT -- The ground-level cosmic ray intensity and events group in UGORI coded message is 4////

    Alternate sources for Thule neutron monitor data

    • U.S. Air Force Weather Agency distributes the source for this data, the  raw , 5-minute, coded GEOPO bulletin from Thule. The AFWA CDC subscription service: 2SYOSDOR@offutt.af.mil to set up an account. Subscribe to message id of HXGL BGTL.

    Please contact David Marshall at SWPC with questions or concerns regarding this change.

    David Marshall
    Space Weather Prediction Center
    david.l.marshall@noaa.gov
    (303) 497-6530


    GOES 13 Designated Primary SWPC GOES Satellite
    for Protons, Electrons and Magnetometer

    April 14 , 2010 -- GOES 13 became the Primary SWPC GOES Satellite for the Proton, Electron and Magnetometer instruments and  GOES 11 is designated the Secondary Satellite.
    GOES 12 is being decommissioned.

    There is currently no Secondary satellite for X-rays. GOES 14 Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) On Orbit Checkout images are available at SWPC.

    GOES 13 HEPAD data -- channels P8 - P11 are temporarily unavailable until calibration issues are resolved.

    Revised Geometrical Factors for GOES 13, 14 and 15 EPEAD Electron Channels

    Starting with GOES 13, SWPC is using new geometrical factors for processing two of the three Energetic Proton, Electron and Alpha Detectors (EPEAD) electron channels (E1 and E3) and a new energy threshold for one of the electron channels (E1).  The processing of the most heavily used channel (E2) remains unchanged.  The changes are summarized as follows:

      GOES 8-12 EPS GOES 13-15 EPEAD
    Channel
    Energy
    (MeV)
    Geom. Fact.
    (cm^2 sr)
    Energy
    (MeV)
    Geom. Fact.
    (cm^2 sr)
    E1
    >0.6 
    0.078
    >0.8
      0.75 (9.6x increase)
    E2
    >2.0
    0.05
    >2.0
      0.05
    E3
    >4.0
    0.0175
    >4.0
      0.056 (3.2x increase)

    These changes represent reevaluations of the instrument performance, not design changes.  There are currently no plans to reprocess the GOES 8-12 electron data.

    Background: On GOES 13, 14 and 15, the Energetic Proton, Electron and Alpha Detectors (EPEAD) are essentially the same as the Energetic Particle Sensor (EPS) on GOES 8-12.  There are two EPEADs on each satellite, one looking east and one looking west.  Of the three electron channels, E1 and E2 are derived from the D3 Dome detector and E3 is derived from the D4 Dome detector.  For more information, please see T. G. Onsager et al. (1996), Operational uses of the GOES energetic particle detectors, in GOES-8 and Beyond, Proc. SPIE, Vol. 2812, edited by E. R. Washwell, pp. 281-290, Bellingham, WA.
    For operational processing at SWPC, a single geometrical factor is applied to the count rates for each channel regardless of the shape of the electron spectrum.  Based in part on recharacterizations of the EPEAD performed for GOES 13, 14 and 15, the instrument contractor recommended effective single geometrical factors and energy thresholds for the three electron channels.  SWPC has adopted the recommended changes for E1 and E3. (For E2, the most heavily used electron channel, the recommended geometrical factor was only 10% lower than the old factor; therefore, for consistency, the old factor has been kept in use for GOES 13-15.) The new factors result in lower fluxes for E1 and E3.
    The old geometrical factors for E1 and E3 were derived by SWPC, not by the contractor.  The difference between the old and new energy thresholds for E1 reflects a gradual “turn-on” of the channel response to electrons.  The new factors do not account for inter-calibration between units on the same spacecraft or on different spacecraft.

    Product Changes

    Data plots: Satellite Environment, Electron Flux, Proton Flux, and Magnetometer. See Today's Space Weather, SWPC Real-time Monitor Displays. Plus Plots of Solar-Geophysical Data accessible via the web or anonymous FTP

    Data Lists: GOES Proton and Electron, Proton Channel, and Magnetometer
    accessible via the web or anonymous FTP

    GOES 13 data appears in Daily Particle Data, Current Space Weather
    values, and Yesterday's Space Weather Values.
    See http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/ftpmenu/latest.html and
    http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/ftpmenu/indices.html

    In 'The WEEKLY', the Daily Particle Data table and the 7-day Proton and Electron plots show GOES 13 data beginning in PRF 1807.


    GOES 14 Primary Satellite for XRS data
    No Secondary Satellite for X-rays or Electrons and Protons

    December 1, 2009 -- The GOES 10 satellite was decommissioned. GOES 14 became the Primary SWPC GOES X-ray Satellite.  Since the XRS data ceased from GOES 11 and GOES 12, there has been no Secondary SWPC GOES X-ray Satellite. There are minor differences in the appearance of the GOES 14 XRS data and at the lowest flux levels.

    There is no Secondary Satellite for Electrons and Protons. 

    Changes to the GOES XRS Data 

    The GOES 10 and GOES 14 XRS instruments have very different electronics and therefore, there are some qualitative changes in the appearance of the data.  The main difference is the level of noise in the data at the lowest values.  When the background levels are low (less than 2E-7 W/m2 or A2.0), the GOES 10 data looked flat and the steps were very abrupt.   At these low flux levels, the GOES 14 data is quite noisy.  As the x-ray flux levels rise up above 2E-7, the noise decreases and the plots look very similar to the GOES 10 data. 

    Other Products Changes

    GOES 14 X-ray Background Flux will appear on these products beginning
    with December 1 values. Daily Solar Data and Daily Space Weather Values

    GOES 14 X-ray Events will appear on these products beginning December 1: Solar Event Reports andSolar and Geophysical Acitivity Summary (Energetic Events)


    GOES 10 Decommissioning Dec 1, 2009
    GOES 14 Becomes Primary Satellite for XRS data

    No Secondary Satellite for X-rays or Electrons and Protons

    SWPC GOES Satellite Designations
    On Dec 1, 2009
    Instrument
    Primary
    Secondary
    X-ray
    GOES 14
    none
    Proton, Electron
    GOES 11
    none
    Magnetometer
    GOES 12
    GOES 11
    Solar X-ray Imager
    none
    none

    November 17, 2009 -- On Tuesday, 01 December, the GOES 10 satellite will be officially decommissioned. At that time, GOES 14 will replace GOES 10 as the Primary SWPC GOES X-ray Satellite.  Since the XRS data ceased from GOES 11 and GOES 12, there has been no Secondary SWPC GOES X-ray Satellite. With the decommissioning of GOES 10, there will also be no Secondary Satellite for Electrons and Protons. There should be only minor differences in the appearance of the XRS data and only at the lowest flux levels.

    Changes to the GOES XRS Data 

    The GOES 10 and GOES 14 XRS instruments have very different electronics and therefore, there will be some qualitative changes in the appearance of the data.  The main difference will be the level of noise in the data at the lowest values.  When the background levels are low (less than 2E-7 W/m2 or A2.0), the GOES 10 data looks flat and the steps are very abrupt.   At these low flux levels, the GOES 14 data will be quite noisy.  As the x-ray flux levels rise up above 2E-7, the noise will decrease and the plots will look very similar to the GOES 10 data. 


    Global D-Region Absorption
    Replacing original D-region Absorption Prediction product

    October 19 -- On November 18, 2009, the Global D-Region Absorption Prediction product will be replace the original D-region Absorption Prediction product. The original D-region web page and products were developed at the then Space Environment Center in 2000.


    SWPC Outage Complete

    July 16, 2009 -- SWPC systems were down for approximately 3 hours for a network system upgrade.


    US-TEC data outage

    May 20-26, 2009 the US-TEC model output was not on the SWPC web site due to technical difficulties. This problem has been fixed as of 1800 UTC, May 26.


    3- 7-, and 30-day STEREO IMPACT Energetic Particle Plots Online

    December 16 , 2008 -- SWPC is now making 3 day, 7 day, and 30 day plots of STEREO IMPACT energetic particle data available.  A new feature on the 30 day plots is the dashed vertical line indicating data from 27 days prior to the plot generation time.  This is convenient for comparing co-rotating structures from one rotation to the next.  Similar plots for the magnetic field data are expected soon


    GOES 11 Becomes Primary Electron Satellite, GOES 10 Secondary Satellite

    SWPC GOES Satellite Designations
    Detector
    Primary
    Secondary
    X-ray
    GOES 10
    none
    Proton, Electron
    GOES 11
    GOES 10
    Magnetometer
    GOES 12
    GOES 11
    Solar X-ray Imager
    none
    none

    December 1, 2008 --On Friday, 28 November, the GOES 12 Electron sensor began experiencing periods of noisy data. Therefore, GOES 11 has been designated the SWPC GOES Electron Satellite and GOES 10 the Secondary.

    The electron detector provides three energetic particle channels: >0.6 MeV electrons, >2 MeV electrons, and 15-40 MeV protons. These data are the basis for alerts and warnings that help to mitigate satellite failures due to spacecraft charging and to mitigate the radiation hazard encountered by astronauts during space walks.


    GOES 11 Proton, Electron, and Magnetometer Outages Through Eclipse Season

    April 14 , 2008 -- Beginning March 12, GOES 11 Proton, Electron and Magnetometer instruments was turned off during eclipse periods. Maximum eclipse times were March 18 0835 to 0945 UT. GOES 11 eclipse season ended April 10.


    GOES 10 X-ray Outages During Eclipse Season

    April 14 , 2008 -- GOES 10 X-ray outages due to spacecraft eclipse season started Feb. 20 and ended April 5. Maximum eclipse duration reached about 65 minutes on March 11. X-ray sensors (XRS) are not operational on other GOES satellites to fill in for the GOES-10 eclipses.


    GOES 10 X-ray Outages During Eclipse Season

    Feb. 21, 2008 -- GOES 10 X-ray outages due to spacecraft eclipse season started Feb. 20 and will continue for about 40 days (April 1). Maximum eclipse duration will reach about 65 minutes peaking in the middle of the interval (March 11). Currently, X-ray sensors (XRS) are not operational on other GOES satellites to fill in for the GOES-10 eclipses.


    GOES 10 Becomes Primary X-ray Satellite, no Secondary Satellite

    SWPC GOES Satellite Designations
    Detector
    Primary
    Secondary
    X-ray GOES 10 none
    Proton GOES 11 GOES 10
    Magnetometer, Electron GOES 12 GOES 11
    Solar X-ray Imager none none

    February 11, 2008 -- GOES 11 X-ray data has been unavailable since Feb. 10. The expectation is that GOES 11 X-rays will remain unavailable. Other GOES 11 data is still available.

    GOES 10 has been moved to the primary SWPC X-rays data. There is no secondary GOES X-ray data at this time. GOES 10 data resumed at 1630 UT Feb 10 and will continue indefinitely.


    No GOES 10 Data Beginning December 17, 2007

    December 18, 2007 -- GOES-10, the SWPC secondary GOES Satellite for X-ray and Proton data, is again not being tracked at SWPC due to antenna problems. SWPC GOES-10 tracking is expected to resume in early February.
    GOES-10 data products continue to be created, but with missing data values.


    GOES 12 Data Resumes After December 5-17, 2007 Outage

    December 18, 2007 -- GOES 12 was unavailable at SWPC from 1010UT December 5 until 2040UT December 17, 2007 due to antenna problems at SWPC.

    GOES 12 Outage Continues

    December 6, 2007 -- GOES 12 has been unavailable since December 5, 1010UT, but there are still expectations of a recovery. If GOES 12 fails SWPC will change the GOES Magnetometer and Electron satellite designations to GOES 11 and GOES 10.

    Unexpected GOES 12 Outage
    Primary GOES Satellite for Magnetometer and Electron may change Dec 6

    December 5, 2007 -- An unexpected GOES 12 outage began at 1010UT. The problem is being investigated and may be resolved soon. If GOES 12 data is not available by late tomorrow the SWPC Primary GOES Satellite for Magnetometer and Electron data will be changed to GOES 11 or 10.


    No GOES 10 X-ray and Proton Data Nov 21 - Dec 5, 2007

    December 5, 2007 -- GOES 10 tracking was restarted in response to the unexpected GOES 12 outage.
    November 21, 2007 -- GOES-10, the SWPC secondary GOES Satellite for X-ray and Proton data, is not being tracked at SWPC due to an antenna problem. GOES-10 data lists will continue to be written with missing data values. GOES-10 satellite tracking at SWPC is expected to resume in 6 to 8 weeks (January 2-16).


    SWPC Auroral Activity Products Enhanced
    with MetOp-02 Satellite Data

    December 4, 2006 -- The SWPC Auroral Activity products were updated to include data from the NOAA Space Environment Monitor (SEM) onboard the European MetOp-02 satellite. The MetOp-02 satellite is a polar orbiting satellite carrying meteorological instruments developed by NOAA and the French Space Agency (CNES). The Space Environment Monitor (SEM) is a heritage instrument flown previously on the NOAA Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) that measures energetic protons and electrons entering the atmosphere. The SEM data is used to provide information about the location and intensity of the auroral oval. The inclusion of the new data enhances the temporal and spatial coverage of the existing auroral products with now five satellites sampling the polar regions.


    SWPC Solar Cycle Products Include Solar Cycle 24 Prediction

    November 15, 2007 -- The Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) has updated its solar cycle product to include the official prediction for the next solar cycle. The official International Space Environment Service (ISES) prediction for solar cycle 24 was released in early 2007. The ISES prediction was issued by a panel chaired by a SWPC representative. It is important to note the panel has only issued a preliminary prediction and has released two separate predictions; a high prediction for sunspot maximum of 140 and a low prediction for sunspot maximum of 90. In the official SWPC product, the average of the two predictions is used. In the near term the two predictions are very similar, with the average not differing from either prediction by more than a SSN of 1 until October, 2008.

    The two individual predictions released by the panel are also available from the SWPC solar cycle web page. It is expected the panel will release a consensus ISES prediction sometime during the early phase of solar cycle 24. At that time, the SWPC product will again be updated with the new prediction.


    Real-time solar wind and particle data
    from the STEREO Beacon online

    November 5, 2007 -- Data from the NASA STEREO mission in-situ instruments can now be viewed at the SWPC web site.  Plots showing the solar wind plasma properties and the energetic electrons and protons measured at each STEREO satellite are updated in near-real-time are accessible from the SWPC STEREO Web site.

    The STEREO mission consists of two spacecraft that are in heliocentric orbits leading and lagging the Earth. Each spacecraft provides a unique observing vantage point, and taken together, they enable a stereoscopic view of the Sun, solar activity, and the solar environment between the Sun and Earth. The STEREO mission studies the Sun and heliosphere with 4 suites of instruments. This web site brings you data from two of the instruments, the PLAsma and Supra Thermal Ion Composition (PLASTIC) Instrument and the In-situ Measurements of Particles and CME Transients (IMPACT) Instrument. These two instruments provide measurements of the solar wind plasma, particles, magnetic field, and solar energetic protons, all quantities that are of significant use in forecasting space weather.

    The near-real-time data, known as the Space Weather Beacon, from STEREO is a compressed, binned, subset of the full science data. The beacon data are broadcast continuously, and if no ground station is listening, the data will not be available until the full science data is dumped. The science data comes down once per day. Note: NOAA is not the general provider of STEREO data, the NASA STEREO project is. STEREO data that is not available on this web site, can be retrieve from the STEREO project.


    Space Environment Center
    Changes Name to
    Space Weather Prediction Center

    On October 1, 2007 the NOAA Space Environment Center changed its name to the Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC).  The center is one of the nine National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)within NOAA's National Weather Service. The new name aligns the space weather center with the other NCEP centers and more clearly conveys its operational nature.

    SWPC.noaa.gov is the new domain for web access (www.swpc.noaa.gov) and Anonymous FTP. The old domain, sec.noaa.gov, will continue to work for the foreseeable future. The simple web URL spaceweather.gov is also available.

    The new name began appearing in web pages and product headers October 1. Web pages use NOAA web formatting standards and some have an updated look and feel, but the data displays and content did not change. Text and graphical products headers use Space Weather Prediction Center (or SWPC), but there were no changes to the file formats or content.


    GOES-12 SXI and XRS Out of Commission Indefinitely

    Impact: on XRS: GOES 11 designated Primary GOES satellite and GOES 10 Secondary. Routine GOES-12 XRS observations suspended indefinitely.

    Impact on SXI: Routine GOES-12 SXI observations suspended indefinitely.

    Aug 24, 2007 -- On 12 April 2007 the ability to point the SXI and XRS solar sensors aboard the GOES-12 spacecraft was lost due to the failure of a component in the electronics box that controls the north-south motion of both instruments. Although the SXI and XRS instruments continue to function, the Sun now enters the field of view only for a brief period twice a year at the equinoxes.

    Since it appears highly unlikely that the pointing functionality can be ever be recovered, routine GOES-12 SXI and XRS observations have been suspended indefinitely. Some limited imaging may be attempted for engineering purposes during the equinoxes, but there is no plan at present to reactivate SXI and XRS in operational mode.


    GOES 12 X-Ray Sensor (XRS) and Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) data not available

    Impact: on XRS: GOES 11 designated Primary GOES satellite and GOES 10 Secondary

    Impact on SXI:  No SXI data available at this time

    April 16, 2007 -- Due to an anomaly in the GOES 12 X-Ray Positioning Electronics box the GOES 12 satellite cannot point the XRS and SXI at the sun, nor can it process the XRS data that normally would pass through it. Thus, no GOES 12 XRS data  have been available at SEC since April 12, 2250 UTC and SXI data is not being distributed due to its poor pointing. SEC has changed its Primary and Secondary XRS satellite designations to GOES 11 and GOES 10 respectively. There may be minor differences between GOES XRS sensors but the differences should not affect products. There are no other SXI sensors operating and thus, there are no alternative solar x-ray image data available on the SEC web site.


    GOES 12 SXI Images May Return

    February 7, 2007 -- A few GOES 12 SXI images were put online. Work continues on a resolution.

    Sept 20, 2006 -- An anomaly occurred with the GOES 12 SXI instrument at approximately 19:35UT on Sept 18 in which the amount of stray light in each of the filter positions increased significantly. This is indicative of the failure of at least one additional front entrance filter (one had failed in Nov, 2003). The SXI was commanded to Safe mode at 15:31 UT on Sept 19 as a precaution. An investigation is underway. Preliminary discussions indicate a significant change to the way SXI is operated may be necessary.


    Proton event contamination of ACE Solar Wind Data ends

    December 13, 2006: Recent solar energetic proton events contaminated the ACE SWEPAM instrument data resulting in incorrect solar wind density, speed, and temperature values being reported by SEC. The latest contamination started at about 0340 UTC on 13 December and ended at about 2000 UTC 13 December as energetic proton fluxes subsided. See GOES Proton Plot for current conditions. ACE RTSW MAG, EPAM, and SIS data were unaffected.


    Proton event contamination of ACE Solar Wind Data ends

    December 8, 2006: Recent solar energetic proton events contaminated the ACE SWEPAM instrument data resulting in incorrect solar wind density, speed, and temperature values being reported by SEC. This contamination started at about 0700 UTC on 07 December and ended about 1930 UTC on 08 December as energetic proton fluxes subsided. See GOES Proton Plot for current conditions. ACE RTSW MAG, EPAM, and SIS data were unaffected.


    Enabling automatic updating web pages in IE7

    December 7, 2006: The recently released Microsoft Internet web browser Internet Explorer 7 (IE7) has a default setting that disables automatic web page refreshes. SEC automatic updating web pages are effected. To enable <META HTTP-EQUIV="Refresh"

    In IE7, select Tools, Internet Options, Security, Custom Level.
    Scroll to the Scripting section near the bottom
    Enable "Allow web sites to prompt for information using scripted windows"

    Please report IE7 or other browser problems to SWPC.Webmaster@noaa.gov


    GOES 12 SXI Temporary Shutdown on September 19, 2006

    Sept 20, 2006 -- An anomaly occurred with the GOES 12 SXI instrument at approximately 19:35UT on Sept 18 in which the amount of stray light in each of the filter positions increased significantly. This is indicative of the failure of at least one additional front entrance filter (one had failed in Nov, 2003). The SXI was commanded to Safe mode at 15:31 UT on Sept 19 as a precaution. An investigation is underway. Preliminary discussions indicate a significant change to the way SXI is operated may be necessary.


    Three 2-week GOES 10 Data Outages from June to October 2006

    June 22, 2006 -- As the secondary SEC GOES satellite for energetic protons, GOES 10 data will not be available at SEC for about two weeks beginning on June 23, because its telemetry frequency will be changed to avoid conflicting with GOES 11 transmissions. There will be two additional periods (approximately 10 - 14 days) when GOES 10 data will not be available, as GOES 10 drifts past GOES 13 and GOES 12. GOES 10 is expected to reach its destination of 60 degrees West by October 2006.


    SEC Secondary GOES Spacecraft Change
    effective June 22, 2006

    At 1400UT, June 22, the SEC secondary GOES satellite for magnetometer, X-ray, and electron measurements changed from GOES 10 to GOES 11. GOES 12 remains the primary SEC GOES satellite. For energetic proton measurements there was no change; GOES 11 remains the primary SEC GOES satellite and GOES 10 the secondary. SEC products that include magnetometer, X-ray, and electron measurements from the secondary SEC GOES satellite changed at that time. See the SEC GOES Satellite page.

    SEC GOES Satellite Designations
    Detector
    Primary
    Secondary
    Proton
    GOES 11
    GOES 10
    Magnetometer, X-ray, Electron
    GOES 12
    GOES 11
    Solar X-ray Imager
    GOES 12
    none

    Operations on the GOES 12 Solar X-Ray Imager (SXI) were not impacted by these changes. There is no secondary SXI until GOES 13 is activated.

    This change is necessary because NOAA will be activating GOES 11 as the operational satellite stationed at 135 degrees West geographic longitude in geosynchronous orbit, replacing the aging GOES 10. GOES 11 will be formally declared GOES West on June 28. GOES 11, in storage mode at 105 degrees West longitude, has been obtaining energetic proton measurements to compensate for the failed detector on GOES 12 (W75). GOES 11 will continue to provide these data. GOES 11 will also now provide solar disk-integrated X-ray measurements and in situ magnetic field, and electron measurements. Pending the successful checkout of GOES 13, and the successful arrival of GOES 11 at 135 degrees West, GOES 10 will be moved to 60 degrees West. The GOES 10 drift maneuver will begin on June 30 with a drift rate of 0.6 degrees per day. GOES 10 is expected to be in its new location by October 2006. This change means it is necessary to reassign secondary designations for the GOES Space Environment Monitor (SEM) detectors.


    Using GNU Wget to Retrieve Web or Anonymous FTP files

    June 15, 2006 -- GNU Wget is a free software package for retrieving files using HTTP, HTTPS and FTP, the most widely-used Internet protocols. Its a non-interactive command line tool, so it may be called from scripts, cron jobs, terminals without X-Windows support, etc. GNU Wget has many features to make retrieving files from web or FTP sites easy. GNU Wget runs on most UNIX-like operating systems as well as Microsoft Windows, and is included with most LINUX distributions.

    Example: Retrieve the Solar Region Summary and store it in a directory called "latest" relative to the users current directory.

    wget --ignore-length -N -O latest/SRS.txt http://www.SWPC.noaa.gov/ftpdir/latest/SRS.txt

    --ignore-length This flag prevents problems with incorrect content length

    -N Turns on time stamping. This switch will cause the file to be retrieved only when it has changed on the server.

    -O (upper case 'O') This switch is used to specify the output filename in this case latest/SRS.txt

    There are many other options. Refer to wget manual

    The UNIX cron utility may be used to schedule wget retrievals. For example, to retrieve the Solar Region Summary report the following command would connect to the web server at 5:40pm and 8:40pm. In this case the '-q' switch has been added which suppresses output from wget. Check with your crontab documentation for specific syntax. Also, it may be necessary in some installations to include a full path to wget executable.

    40 17,20 * * * wget --ignore-length -Nq -O /tmp/latest/SRS.txt http://www.SWPC.noaa.gov/ftpdir/latest/SRS.txt


    ACE RTSW SWEPAM Data Improvement

    June 2, 2006 -- The ACE RTSW SWEPAM data processing was updated at 0000 UTC on June 1, 2006. This change will result in improved solar wind parameters (speed, density, and temperature) that more closely match ACE Science Center data. ACE RTSW MAG, EPAM, and SIS data are unaffected.


    NWS Termination of ACE Solar Wind Data
    Comment period April 3 - May 18, 2006


    Gopher Service Discontinued

    May, 2005 http://www.SWPC.noaa.gov/ftpmenu/index.html is the alternative to gopher:// protocol

    June 2, 2005 Gopher Service Discontinued
    Gopher service was interrupted May 7 during the major network and computer problems. We have since decided to discontinue Gopher services. The Gopher interface is available from a
    web browser at http://SWPC.noaa.gov/ftpmenu Gopher customers can contact us if this service is critical.


    May 31, 2005 MAJOR SEC PROBLEMS May 7-9, 2005

    SEC experienced major network and computer problems May 7. Most systems were restored by May 9, but a few network connections and SEC products are still unavailable. Remaining products will resume as corrections are completed.

    Most FTP content has been restored except for the following.

    • A few POES Hemispheric Power Input (HPI) and Belt Indices (BI) data files. The near real time POES plots and their related data files are updating.
    • The SOLAR2000 - Solar irradiance and E10.7 Nowcast
    • The NOAA Mg II daily Index

    May 19 - 26, 2005 ACE SIS RTSW proton rates were noisy
    February 10, 2005 - WAREHOUSE of Historical SEC Products and Data Displays Online

    A new "warehouse" FTP directory has been created for historical products from 1996 up to the current day. The following products are in yearly .tar.gz files.

    Products:
    Report of Solar and Geophysical Activity (RSGA),
    Solar Region Summary (SRS),
    Solar and Geophysical Activity Summary (SGAS),
    World Warning Agency GEOALERT (GEOA),
    Edited Solar Events

    Solar Indices as ascii text files: Daily Solar Data, Daily
    Geomagnetic Data, and Daily Particle Data

    Plots for GOES Electrons, GOES Hp, GOES Protons, GOES X-rays,
    Estimated Planetary Kp, and the SWPC Satellite Environment.

    See the FTP server ftp.SWPC.noaa.gov at /pub/warehouse or
    via a web browser at http://SWPC.noaa.gov/ftpdir/warehouse


    February 9, 2005 -- NEW EMAIL PRODUCT SUBSCRIPTION SERVICE

    SEC has a new Product Subscription Service (PSS) for email delivery of our products. The PSS system replaces the Majordomo List Server and the Space Weather Alerts email service. Both older services will continue through April.

    PSS is an online, interactive system that allows you to register and then subscribe to the variety of email products. There are even new products. Go to https://pss.SWPC.noaa.gov/ and register. Older products are now online, see Products from 1996 at FTP Warehouse.


    January 24, 2005 -- ACE SOLAR WIND DATA CONTAMINATED

    Recent solar energetic proton events contaminated the ACE SWEPAM instrument data resulting in incorrect solar wind density, speed, and temperature values being reported by SEC. There were essentially two outages due to the proton events: Jan 17 13:22 -- Jan 18 22:40 UTC and Jan 20 07:00 -- Jan 21 17:00 UTC
    December 23-26, 2004 -- Intermittent Thule Data Outages Dec 23 1525 to Dec 26

    SEC Offers New Experimental Ionospheric Product

    November 1, 2004 - The NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center and NOAA National Geodetic Survey released an experimental ionosphere product to help emergency managers and other users quickly assess the effects of solar storms on Global Positioning System applications. The USTEC map aids users affected by ionospheric conditions-GPS applications, surveyors, emergency managers, and others-to quickly assess the current situation that may impact their systems. See NOAA news story Nov. 1, 2004


    August 24, 2004 ACE MAG Data Processing Change
    ACE MAG data processing was updated at 0000 UTC on 24 August, 2004. This update should result in improved RTSW magnetic field values that more closely match ACE Science Center data.

    ACE Telemetry Masked May 30 - June 2, 2004

    May 14, 2004 ACE NOTICE
    The ACE spacecraft will be close in front of the Sun from about May 30-June 2, 2004. During that time the telemetry will be masked by solar radio noise, and we will have no solar wind plasma, magnetic field, or particle data.


    April 22, 2004 -- More Near Real-time Ionospheric Stations Reporting
    Data Lists for additional near real-time Ionospheric stations are online, and more stations are expected over the next year. SEC currently receives data from 52 stations, and 45 report in SAO format. See Ionospheric Data Lists

    Mar, 2004 Boulder Colorado, Mawson Antarctica, Bear Lake Utah, & Tromso Norway
    Feb, 2004 Grahamstown, Louisvale, and Madimbo from South Africa.


    February 4, 2004-- ACE RTSW EPAM Data Channel Change
    Real-time proton data from the EPAM LEMS30 instrument has been replaced with similar proton data from the LEMS120 sensor. The new proton channels cover the following energy ranges: 47-68 keV, 115-195 keV, 310-580 keV, and 1.06-1.9 MeV. Previous real-time electron (38-53, 175-315 keV) and proton (0.761-1.22 MeV) data from the EPAM CA60 telescope remain unchanged. Plots and Data Lists of 5-minute and 1-hour averaged data were backfilled to January 29, 2004. Additional information concerning these new data can be found in the ACE Lists README file or via anonymous FTP: ftp.SWPC.noaa.gov cd /pub/lists/ace get README

    Switchover rescheduled to Feb 4, 2004

    January 15, 2004 ACE RTSW EPAM Data Changes
    SEC is proceeding to switch the ACE RTSW EPAM proton data processing to another sensor. The operational switch over to the new sensor data has been reschedule to February 4, 2004. It is anticipated that the following proton energy ranges will be available: 47-68 keV (P1'), 115-195 keV (P3'), 321-587 keV (P5'), and 1060-1900 keV (P7').

    November 12, 2003 -- As a result of the last two weeks of high solar activity several of the RTSW EPAM proton channels have become abnormally high and have shown excessive noise. As a result the data from the 65-112 keV (P2), 112-187 keV (P3), and 310-50 keV (P5) energy channels have been removed from the real-time plots and lists. The 1060-1910 keV (P7) channel remains but has also begun to show noise. The 761-1220 (W1) proton channel and electron channels, being from another EPAM sensor, have been unaffected. SEC is investigating the switch to another EPAM proton sensor for its RTSW data stream.


    January 5, 2004 -- New "X-RAY FLARE" Event Type
    GOES Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) flare (XFL) reports were added to Edited Solar Events Lists on January 5. Edited Events lists from Jan 1 have been reprocessed to included XFL reports. See "Information about Edited Events" in the Solar Event Reports directory (/events/README) for more details.


    November 4, 2003 -- ACE SOLAR WIND DATA CONTAMINATION ENDS
    The solar energetic proton event that contaminated the ACE SWEPAM instrument data resulting in incorrect solar wind density, speed, and temperature values being reported by SEC Nov 2-3 ended November 3 about 2040UT. See GOES PROTON PLOTS

    November 3, 2003 -- ACE EPAM Data Problems
    On October 29 the ACE EPAM 65-112 keV (P2) and 112-187 keV (P3) energy channels became spuriously high following the onset of a large solar energetic particle event and have not returned to nominal values. In addition, the 310-580 keV (P5) channel became elevated and erratic on November 1 and 2 during a second solar energetic particle event. The P5 channel appears to have recovered; however, this does not preclude similar problems in the future. The EPAM instrument team and SEC are investigating the cause of these problems and a possible cure. Look for more information here as information becomes available.

    November 2, 2003 -- ACE SOLAR WIND DATA CONTAMINATED
    A solar energetic proton event is contaminating the ACE SWEPAM instrument data resulting in incorrect solar wind density, speed, and temperature values being reported. The contamination begin Nov 2 at 1820 UTC. See GOES PROTON PLOT

    October 28, 2003 -- ACE SOLAR WIND DATA CONTAMINATED
    A solar energetic proton event is contaminating the ACE SWEPAM instrument data resulting in incorrect solar wind density, speed, and temperature values being reported. The contamination begin Oct 28 at 1242 UTC. See GOES Proton Plot


    Sept 5, 2003 -- Solar Image Files Ended
    No solar images have been received since Sept 1. The /gif and /fits directories will be emptied in the near future. See alternative solar image sites.

    July 21, 2003 -- SEC Solar Image Web Pages and File Ending September 1, 2003
    After 10 years, SEC is replacing their solar images web pages) with a new Solar Image Sites References web page. The new page will contain links to solar image sites used by SEC Space Weather Operations in their routine analysis of solar activity. Watch for the new page in August. The solar image pages and files are scheduled to end September 1, 2003.

    SEC is making these changes because the number of sites used by SEC for our current web pages has decreased and fewer images are being offered. There are now many other web sites with high-quality, near-real-time solar images, from a variety of ground-based and space-based sources.

    The static filenames for the current h-alpha images will also end September 1:

    current_fdha_stamp.gif and current_fdha.gif
    current_region_stamp.gif and current_region.gif

    SEC has static filenames for current solar x-ray coronal structure images from the NOAA GOES SXI Imager. See SXI Static Filenames links and description .


    Summer 2003 -- GOES Designation Changes

    Background (May 15, 2003)

    The GOES 10 energetic proton detectors are showing intermittent, high noise levels in the higher energy proton channels (greater than about 80 MeV). This problem was first noticed in data taken April 26, 2003. (see data plot from this time period). Further analysis revealed that the noise spikes were occurring on the P6 and P7 proton channels and a similar spike was observed at around the same time for several days. These noise spikes occurred late in the UT day and coincided with temperature peaks on the Dome subassembly on the energetic particles sensor (EPS). This pattern is very similar to problems experienced on the P6 and P7 particle channels on the GOES 12 EPS Dome detector prior to their failure earlier this year. The loss of data from the P6 and P7 channels significantly impacts the integral proton flux products above about 10 MeV (e.g., >10 MeV, >50 MeV, and >100 MeV). The P6 channel also impacts our electron measurements; a correction algorithm using proton counts from P6 is applied to the electron count rate to take into account contamination from protons.

    General GOES Information -- The electron measurements will differ somewhat between GOES 10 and GOES 12. This difference is due to the different geomagnetic latitudes of the two spacecraft. Both GOES 10 and GOES 12 are located on the geographic equator, but due to the tilt of Earth's dipole magnetic field, GOES 10 (at 135 degrees west longitude) is at a lower geomagnetic latitude than GOES 12 (at 75 degrees west longitude). Because of the different geomagnetic latitudes, GOES 10 on average measures a larger electron flux than GOES 12. The relative variations in flux from time to time are roughly similar at the two spacecraft locations.

    June 19, 2003 -- To ensure continued operational monitoring of important energetic particle data, it is necessary to reassign primary/secondary designations for the GOES Space Environment Monitor (SEM) detectors. Beginning 1700 UTC on June 19, GOES 11 (105W) will become the primary satellite for protons. GOES 12 (75W) will continue as the primary satellite for magnetometer, X-ray, and electron measurements. GOES 10 (135W) will be the secondary satellite for all SEM sensors - magnetometer, X-ray, and energetic particles. Because of the degraded state of the proton data on GOES-10, its designation as the secondary source for proton data is a short-term solution. More permanent solutions have been identified and are being evaluated. Users will be notified when we define and schedule a permanent fix.

    Sensors
    Primary
    Secondary
    Proton
    GOES 11
    GOES 10
    Magnetometer, X-ray
    Electron
    GOES 12
    GOES 10
    Solar X-ray Imager
    GOES 12
    no secondary satellite

    Users should be aware that GOES 11 is in a storage mode at 113W. Because of the recent problems on the EPS detectors on GOES 10 and 12, we are forced to take the unprecedented action of activating the EPS sensor (for operational purposes) on a storage satellite - GOES 11. The GOES-11 EPS Dome detector does not appear to be experiencing the problems encountered with both the GOES 10 and 12 domes. However, the satellite is spinning in storage mode, with a nine- minute spin period; consequently, there will likely be short outages when the transmit antenna is hidden by the spacecraft body. These outages have diurnal and seasonal variations that are difficult to assess, but data loss is expected to be minimal. This spin mode will likely produce small variations in the measured fluxes due to the changing look direction of the sensors.

    The electron processing algorithm has been modified in response to the high noise level that recently developed in the GOES 12, P6 proton channel. A correction algorithm is applied to the electron count rate to take into account contamination from protons. The standard correction algorithm uses proton counts from the P3, P4, P5, and P6 channels. The modified correction algorithm no longer uses data from the P6 channel. As a result, the proton correction algorithm gives a smaller correction at all times. The electron fluxes will not be as low during time periods of flux minima, and the correction will not be as extreme during large proton events. For a greater than 2 MeV electron flux of 100 particles/(cm2-s-sr), this modification will result in a flux reduction of roughly 10%. For an electron flux of 1000 particles/(cm2-s-sr), the modification will be roughly a 1% flux reduction.

    Operations on the Solar X-Ray Imager (SXI) on GOES-12 will not be impacted by these changes. There is no secondary SXI.

    May 15, 2003 -- The GOES 10 energetic proton detectors are showing intermittent, high noise levels in the higher energy proton channels (greater than about 80 MeV). This pattern is similar to problems experienced on the GOES 12 EPS Dome detector prior its P6 and P7 channel failures earlier this year. The loss of the P6 and P7 channels significantly impacts SEC's integral proton flux products above about 10 MeV (e.g., >10 MeV, >50 MeV, and >100 MeV). Therefore, the energetic proton detectors on the GOES 8 satellite is being used for the next 2-3 month.

    Proton
    Primary GOES 8
    Secondary GOES 10
    Magnetometer
    X-ray, Electron
    Primary GOES 12
    Secondary GOES 10
    Solar X-ray Imager
    Primary GOES 12
    no secondary satellite

    April 8, 2003 --GOES Satellite Changes -- SEC stopped using GOES 8 data. GOES 10 is now SEC's primary GOES satellite, with GOES 12 the backup for non-SXI data: magnetometer, XRS x-ray measurements, and energetic particles. SXI is only available from GOES 12.


    Correction to X-ray Background Flux Calculation

    November 4, 2002 Dr. Rodney Viereck, e-mail: Rodney.Viereck@noaa.gov

    In October, 2002 SEC determined that its Daily GOES X-ray Background Flux calculation was incorrect. The values were corrected as of 22 October 2002. Archives of the daily background values both at SEC and at NGDC will be corrected in due course.

    It was brought to our attention that the Daily GOES X-ray Background Flux calculation at the Space Environment Center was not correct. The computed values seemed too high. After a quick look at the values and the original data, it was agreed that indeed, there was something wrong. Further investigation showed that the code used for calculating the background flux was using 5-minute X-ray data instead of 1-hour X-ray data.

    Historical Note: The X-ray Background Flux was developed in the early 1980s as a measure of the background solar x-ray flux. The algorithm for calculating this daily background flux is weighted towards the middle of the day for time series analysis and for comparisons with the solar F10.7 flux index, which is measured at local noon.

    Daily GOES X-ray Background Flux algorithm:

    • The 24 one-hour X-ray 1-8 values are divided into three 8-hour sections
    • The minimum for each of these three 8-hour sections is determined; .call them min1, min2, and min3
    • The average of the minima from the first and last 8-hour sections is calculated
      min_avg = 1/2 (min1 + min3)
    • Daily Background X-Ray Flux is the smallest of min2 or min_avg
      X-Ray_background = minimum of (min2 or min_avg)

    This algorithm was implemented incorrectly, using 5-minute average values instead of 1-hour average values. Thus, the X-ray background was calculated using only the first two hours of the day. Most of the time, this provided values that were not far from the true background X-ray value, but when a long-duration flare occurred at the beginning of the UT day it could introduce significant errors of an order of magnitude or more. Further investigation uncovered that this error has been in place since at least 1987.

    The daily X-ray background flux values have been corrected as of 22 October 2002. The archive of the daily background values both at SEC and at NGDC will be corrected in due course.

    GOES X-ray Background Flux appears in several SEC products: Solar and Geophysical Activity Summary, Daily Solar Data , Yesterday's Space Weather Values , Preliminary Report and Forecast of Solar Geophysical Data


    August 23, 2002 -- The USAF stopped producing the Magnetometer Analysis Reports, FOR SECONDARY STATIONS ONLY.

    July 1, 2002 -- SEC stopped running the Operational Magnetospheric Specification Model. The Predictive MSM based on the Costello Geomagnetic Activity Index test product, is online.

    June 14, 2002 Solar Region Number Sequence
    The latest SEC Solar Region Number is 9998, and is expected to reach 10,000 this weekend. SEC products will continue to use 4-digit region numbers, with leading zeros. The sequencing for Solar Region Numbers will be: 9998, 9999, 0000, 0001,...

    May 24, 2002 USAF stops issuing the 27-day Solar Radio Flux Forecast

    Alternatives 10.7cm Solar Radio Flux Forecasts are The SEC 27-Day Outlook of 10.7cm Flux, Ap, and largest Kp list (with other forecasts)
    The USAF 45-Day AP and F10.7cm Flux Forecast at (last 20)

    May 24, 2002 -- The USAF stops producing the Auroral Oval Analysis Plot
    On May 23, the USAF stopped production of the Auroral Oval Plot.

    The information contained in this bulletin will be depicted in a graphical format on USAF web pages at HTTPS://WEATHER.AFWA.AF.MIL OR HTTP://SAFWIN.OFFUTT.AF.SMIL.MIL The new format is NOT available on the SEC FTP server. If you have questions or concerns please contact HQ AFWA/XORC AT DSN 271-1631 OR COMMERCIAL (402) 294-1631.

    May 3, 2002 -- Solar Region Number Sequence -- The SEC Solar Region Number, currently at 9936, is expected to reach 10,000 in the next 60 days. SEC products will continue to use 4-digit region numbers, with leading zeros. The sequencing for Solar Region Numbers will be: 9998, 9999, 0000, 0001


    March 2002 -- New Space Weather Alerts
    SEC Space Weather Alerts were redesign to provide the following improvements:

    • New message formats that enhance readability and support automatic decoding
    • Alerts issued when a threshold is crossed, instead of after standard time intervals, or end of the event
    • New "Summary" products issued after the end of some events
    • New alerts that match higher thresholds defined in the NOAA Space Weather Scales
    • Dynamic SEC Alerts web pages with current alerts status, displays of alerting data, links to related data, alert archive logs, and online help.

    March 2002 -- WWV (Geophysical Alert Message) FORMAT CHANGE
    The WWV message format changed. See the WWV description web page. This affected all distribution methods: Web, Anonymous FTP, e-mail, and NWS Direct Distribution Systems.

    March 2002 -- Space Weather Products on NWS Direct Distribution Systems, including the NOAA Weather Wire Service
    Space Weather products distributed on NWS Direct Distribution Systems have NWS header and minor format changes. Some users saw two new products: Space Weather Advisory Outlooks and Bulletins. See the Space Weather Products on NWS Direct Broadcast Systems web page. This affected subscriber of the SEC e-mail list and NWS direct distribution system users, including the NOAA Weather Wire Service


    May 2001 -- SCDR Report Discontinued
    The Joint USAF/NOAA Solar Coronal Disturbance Report (SCDR) was discontinued on May 9. The NOAA Weather Wire "Summary of Space Weather Observations" and "Space Weather Event Reports" are affected by the loss of Coronal reports. SCDR references on this page have been removed, and the sample Weather Wire products show the new format.


    October 2000 -- Text Product Changed to Mixed-Case Text

    October 2, 2000 SEC began issuing its text products in mixed cases instead of all upper case. Only the case of the text in each product changed, not the format or spacing within the product.

    Joint USAF/NOAA products -- Solar Region Summary, Solar and Geophysical Activity Summary, Report of Solar and Geophysical Activity, Highlights and Forecast of Solar and Geophysical Data

    NOAA Weather Wire Space Weather products -- Summary of Space Weather Observations, Space Weather Event Reports, Daily Space Weather Summary and Forecast, Seven-day Space Weather Highlights, Twenty-seven day Space Weather Forecast

    Rules for Mixed Case Text Products
    Upper case is used for

    1. Acronyms, e.g., NOAA, USAF, HSTRY, SITS, SOONSPOT, GOES, ACE, CME
    2. The first letter of major words in the title of message, e.g., Joint USAF/NOAA Report of Solar and Geophysical Activity
    3. Roman numerals, e.g., I, and IV
    4. Section identifiers for each message, e.g., IIA. and D.
    5. The first letter of major words following section identifiers, e.g., I. Regions with Sunspots. Locations Valid at 06/2400Z
    6. The first letter for column headings, e.g., Begin, Max, and End
    7. The first letter of sentences
    8. First letter of descriptions for missing data or observations, e.g., None or No data or No observations

    Rules for space weather terms

    • Coordinates - N22W41 (North 22 degrees, West 41 degrees)
    • Flare classification - Sf (Sub faint)
    • Xray classification - M5 (5 * M flare level)
    • Sunspot classification - Hsx
    • Magnetic classification - Beta-gamma
    • Abbreviations for elements - He (Helium)
    • Wavelength - EUV, Xray
    • Exponents - 7.1e-07
    • Coordinated Universal Time - UTC, UT, or Z
    • Time qualifiers - B (Before), A (After), U (Unknown)



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