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Space Weather Prediction Center

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Thursday, January 18, 2018 21:48:05

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NOAA Scales mini

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Space Weather Conditions
24-Hour Observed Maximums
R
no data
S
no data
G
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Latest Observed
R
no data
S
no data
G
no data
R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
G
no data
R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
G
no data
R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
G
no data
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R
no data
S
no data
G
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Current Space Weather Conditions
R1 (Minor) Radio Blackout Impacts
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HF Radio: Weak or minor degradation of HF radio communication on sunlit side, occasional loss of radio contact.
Navigation: Low-frequency navigation signals degraded for brief intervals.
More about the NOAA Space Weather Scales

Solar Prominence on the Southeast Limb

GONG H-alpha Image from the Learmonth observatory in Australia
Solar Prominence on the Southeast Limb
published: Monday, September 21, 2015 20:38 UTC

A nice solar prominence has begun to migrate around the southeastern limb of the sun. The red-glowing looped material is plasma, a hot ionized gas composed of electrically charged hydrogen and helium. The prominence plasma flows along a tangled and twisted structure of magnetic field lines that are generated by the sun’s internal dynamo. Prominence plasma is much cooler and denser than the plasma found in the corona. As forecasters we watch prominence and filament features for instability that can release the feature in an eruptive manner. An eruptive prominence or filament can become a coronal mass ejection and have potential impacts on the Earth's magnetosphere.