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National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Sunday, January 21, 2018 21:59:34

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NOAA Scales mini

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Space Weather Conditions
24-Hour Observed Maximums
R
no data
S
no data
G
no data
Latest Observed
R
no data
S
no data
G
no data
R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
G
no data
R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
G
no data
R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
G
no data
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R
no data
S
no data
G
no data
Current Space Weather Conditions
R1 (Minor) Radio Blackout Impacts
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HF Radio: Weak or minor degradation of HF radio communication on sunlit side, occasional loss of radio contact.
Navigation: Low-frequency navigation signals degraded for brief intervals.
More about the NOAA Space Weather Scales

G3 downgraded to G1

24 June ACE plot
G3 downgraded to G1
published: Monday, June 29, 2015 14:01 UTC
The coronal mass ejection (CME) from 22 June appears to have arrived at Earth a bit earlier, and with less magnitude, than expected. Around 1300 UTC (0900 EDT) on 24 June, an increase in solar wind speeds and a slight increase in the magnetic field were observed at the ACE spacecraft.  Both are indications of the likely arrival of the anticipated CME. The resulting weak response a short time later from several magnetometers around the world, indicate that we were likely only hit by the edge of the plasma cloud as it passed by Earth.  Solar wind speeds are still elevated and Earth's magnetic field is still slightly agitated, keeping at least a slight chance for increased geomagnetic storming as the US moves into night time hours.  While still possible, the likelihood for most of the continental US to see the Aurora is not as probable as originally forecast.  Geomagnetic activity is expected to continue to subside over the next couple of days.
 
Stay tuned here for updates.