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Space Weather Prediction Center

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Tuesday, December 12, 2017 00:32:22

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NOAA Scales mini

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Space Weather Conditions
24-Hour Observed Maximums
R
no data
S
no data
G
no data
Latest Observed
R
no data
S
no data
G
no data
R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
G
no data
R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
G
no data
R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
G
no data
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R
no data
S
no data
G
no data
Current Space Weather Conditions
R1 (Minor) Radio Blackout Impacts
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HF Radio: Weak or minor degradation of HF radio communication on sunlit side, occasional loss of radio contact.
Navigation: Low-frequency navigation signals degraded for brief intervals.
More about the NOAA Space Weather Scales

WAM-IPE

The WAM-IPE model (WAM; Whole Atmosphere Model, IPE; Ionosphere Plasmasphere Electrodynamics) is a comprehensive, 3D, time-dependent, coupled model of the Earth's Ionosphere, Thermosphere and Lower Atmosphere. The model predicts global Ionospheric parameters such as the Total Electron Content (TEC) and the peak Ionospheric electron density (NmF2), dynamic parameters which are important factors affecting GPS positioning and HF radio communications. 

The WAM component has been embedded within the National Weather Service operational data assimilation system (GSI; Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation), a 3D variational scheme. The simulations using WAM and the modified GSI data assimilation scheme (known as WDAS; WAM Data Assimilation Scheme) enables the response of the upper atmosphere to real tropospheric weather to be followed.

The first and second panels show the latest global Total Electron Content (TEC) as predicted by WAM-IPE, and the Anomaly in TEC (the difference between the latest TEC and a running 10 day average taken at the same universal time.)

The third and fourth panels are from the same model run but show the latest global peak Ionospheric electron number density (NmF2), and again, the Anomaly in NmF2.

Finally, the fifth and sixth panels show the height of the Ionospheric peak in km (hmF2) and the associated anomaly.