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Space Weather Prediction Center

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Friday, December 15, 2017 02:28:24

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NOAA Scales mini

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Space Weather Conditions
24-Hour Observed Maximums
R
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Latest Observed
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S
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R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
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R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
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no data
R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
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no data
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R
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Current Space Weather Conditions
R1 (Minor) Radio Blackout Impacts
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HF Radio: Weak or minor degradation of HF radio communication on sunlit side, occasional loss of radio contact.
Navigation: Low-frequency navigation signals degraded for brief intervals.
More about the NOAA Space Weather Scales

Education and Outreach

A close up picture of the sun that reads NOAA Space Weather Toolkit.<br />
		This website is designed to quick and easily access space weather information and resources with the goal of sharing knowledge and expertise with a broad audience.

What is space weather?

Space Weather refers to variations in the space environment between the sun and Earth (and throughout the solar system) that can affect technologies in space and on Earth. Space weather is primarily driven by solar storm phenomenon that include coronal mass ejections, solar flares, solar particle events and solar wind. These phenomena can occur in various regions on the sun’s surface, but only Earth directed solar storms are potential drivers of space weather events on Earth. An understanding of solar storm phenomena is an important component to developing accurate space weather forecasts (event onset, location, duration, and magnitude).

Why does space weather matter?

Space weather is a global issue. Unlike terrestrial weather events, like a hurricane, space weather has the potential to impact not only the United States, but wider geographic regions. These complex events can have significant economic consequences and have the potential to negatively affect numerous sectors, including communications, satellite and airline operations, manned space flights, navigation and surveying systems, as well as the electric power grid.