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Space Weather Prediction Center

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Saturday, December 16, 2017 07:06:36

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NOAA Scales mini

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Space Weather Conditions
24-Hour Observed Maximums
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Latest Observed
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R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
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R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
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R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
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Current Space Weather Conditions
R1 (Minor) Radio Blackout Impacts
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HF Radio: Weak or minor degradation of HF radio communication on sunlit side, occasional loss of radio contact.
Navigation: Low-frequency navigation signals degraded for brief intervals.
More about the NOAA Space Weather Scales

GOES-Next Requirements Workshop

GOES Next: Space Weather Requirements Workshop

UPDATE: Thank you to everybody who attended the GOES Next Workshop and provided their thoughts, opinions, and feedback. The initial perspectives and considerations for GOES Next planning were insightful and only the beginning of the planning phases. This was a very successful start of a process to have institutional and user input as we all forge ahead in the next phases of GOES Next planning. 

Detailed agenda with presentations

BACKGROUND: Even before the newest series of GOES satellites (GOES R+) launches in 2016, plans are initiating for the next generation of GOES satellites, the first of which could be launched as early as 2024. Space weather sensors have been part of the GOES satellite sensor suite since the beginning of the GOES program in 1975.  For each block of satellites, Space Weather Prediction Center assesses the requirements for space weather sensors. This assessment is based on the needs and requirements of the operational Space Weather Forecast Office, as well as the customers of space weather products and services. The space weather sensor suite on GOES R+ provides data on the solar x-ray and extreme ultraviolet irradiance, UV images of the sun as well as measurements of the energetic particle environment and magnetic field in geosynchronous orbit. The sensors that observe the various components of the space environment have been built to specifications dictated by the operational needs of forecasters and customers of space weather services. 

At this workshop, we will review the current set of observation requirements that have guided the development of the space weather sensors on the GOES R+ series of spacecraft. This workshop will begin with a plenary session to review the design capabilities, launch schedules and products of the current and upcoming GOES spacecraft. The group will then break into two subgroups, one of which will focus on the in-situ observations of energetic particles and magnetic fields. The second group will focus on the solar irradiance and imaging requirements. It should be noted that the intention of this first meeting is to refine requirements and to identify gaps in observations rather than to define detailed mission requirements. The anticipated outcome of this initial discussion will be a summary of the observational requirements for the GOES space weather sensors and a suggestion for changes or modifications of these requirements. 

These discussions are open to anyone however, if you plan to attend, please send an email to rodney.viereck@noaa.gov and indicate which of the two parallel sessions you would like to participate in. This will be the first of several meetings. Future meetings and workshops will examine both requirements and the technologies and instrument capabilities needed to meet those requirements.