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National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Friday, November 24, 2017 13:11:43

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NOAA Scales mini

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Space Weather Conditions
24-Hour Observed Maximums
R
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S
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G
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Latest Observed
R
no data
S
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G
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R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
G
no data
R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
G
no data
R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
G
no data
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R
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Current Space Weather Conditions
R1 (Minor) Radio Blackout Impacts
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HF Radio: Weak or minor degradation of HF radio communication on sunlit side, occasional loss of radio contact.
Navigation: Low-frequency navigation signals degraded for brief intervals.
More about the NOAA Space Weather Scales

G1 (Minor Geomagnetic Storm) WATCH for 13 and 14 March

LASCO coronagraph image of filament eruption NNW
G1 (Minor Geomagnetic Storm) WATCH for 13 and 14 March
published: Monday, March 16, 2015 12:36 UTC

Following the backfill of nearly 30 hours of LASCO coronagraph data, analysis revealed multiple coronal mass ejections (CMEs) associated with several R1 (Minor) and R2 (Moderate) radio blackouts, as well as the R3 (Strong) radio blackout, and the 22 degree long solar filament that lifted off the NNW solar limb. However, only two of the CMEs were of particular interest, with the others having a trajectory too far off the Sun-Earth line. Subsequent WSA-Enlil output revealed the CME associated with the filament that erupted between 11/0625-0815 UTC ( 12 March from 0225-0415 EDT) may potentially have an impact as a possible weak, glancing blow mid to late in the day on 14 March. The CME from the R3 (Strong) radio blackout, while impressive in coronagraph imagery, should pass well to the east of the Sun-Earth line. Analysis is on-going for the more recent R1 (Minor) radio blackouts.

In addition to the G1 (Minor) WATCH issued for 13 March, a G1 (Minor) geomagnetic Storm WATCH has been issued for 14 March in response to the potential impacts from multiple glancing blow CMEs combined with the influence of increased solar winds associated with a positive polarity coronal hole.

Stay tuned here for updates.