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National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Sunday, April 22, 2018 04:58:35

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Space Weather Conditions
24-Hour Observed Maximums
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Latest Observed
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R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
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R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
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R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
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Current Space Weather Conditions
R1 (Minor) Radio Blackout Impacts
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HF Radio: Weak or minor degradation of HF radio communication on sunlit side, occasional loss of radio contact.
Navigation: Low-frequency navigation signals degraded for brief intervals.
More about the NOAA Space Weather Scales

Non-Earth Directed CME Visible from Three Different Perspectives

An EPL as seen from the STEREO and SDO spacecraft
Non-Earth Directed CME Visible from Three Different Perspectives
published: Sunday, December 06, 2015 17:12 UTC

An eruptive prominence from the southeast limb (EPL) was observed on December 2nd between approximately 1659 to 1900 UTC (1159-1400 ET). The EPL was noted in SDO/AIA-304 imagery from its inclined geosynchronous orbit near Earth [as seen in the orange imagery noted in the accompanying graphic]. The EPL was also captured by NASA's STEREO-Ahead spacecraft in its orbit just behind and to the east of the Sun. The STEREO images clearly show a filament erupting outward from the far-side of the Sun. Additionally, the SOHO spacecraft also captured an associated coronal mass ejection (CME) in its LASCO-C3, coronagraph imagery traveling outward along a southeast vector from its orbital position between the Earth and the Sun. Due to the filament's eruption from the far-side of the Sun, the associated CME is not Earth-directed. However, this activity is a good example of how SWPC forecasters utilize different sources of data in order to make the most accurate analysis and forecast possible.