NOAA Logo

NWS Logo

Organizations

Space Weather Prediction Center

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Friday, August 05, 2022 19:18:16

Main menu

NOAA Scales mini

minimize icon
Space Weather Conditions
24-Hour Observed Maximums
R
no data
S
no data
G
no data
Latest Observed
R
no data
S
no data
G
no data
R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
G
no data
R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
G
no data
R1-R2 --
R3-R5 --
S1 or greater --
G
no data
maximize icon
R
no data
S
no data
G
no data
Current Space Weather Conditions
R1 (Minor) Radio Blackout Impacts
close
HF Radio: Weak or minor degradation of HF radio communication on sunlit side, occasional loss of radio contact.
Navigation: Low-frequency navigation signals degraded for brief intervals.
More about the NOAA Space Weather Scales

M9 Flare (R2 - Moderate Radio Blackout) on 21 April, 2022

R2 Event on 21 April, 2022 - M9 flare
M9 Flare (R2 - Moderate Radio Blackout) on 21 April, 2022
published: Sunday, April 24, 2022 02:48 UTC

Region 2993 produced an M9.6 flare (R2-Moderate Radio Blackout) at 9:59 pm EDT (21/0159 UTC). Region 2993 is one of two moderately complex sunspot groups currently present on the northeast quadrant of the Sun - the other being Region 2994. The moderate level flare was associated with multiple bursts on specific radio frequencies to include a one of 370 solar flux units on 2695 MHz. Additionally, Type II and IV radio sweeps were detected by the USAF Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), with an estimated velocity of 1132 km/s. These radio signatures are often indicative of a potential coronal mass ejection (CME). The most recent imagery from the NASA/SOHO LASCO instrument confirms a CME took place. SWPC forecasters are currently analyzing the CME to determine the likelihood of any Earth-directed component.